Well for the 10 millionth year in a row, there will be no White Christmas for West Texas, but this should not be a shock.

I have never experienced a White Christmas in Midland/Odessa in my life even though there was one in 1987.

That was one of the years I spent Christmas in Houston, who as far as I am aware has never had a White Christmas ever but it has snowed there, the last time being in the big freeze of February 2021.

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I do remember one Christmas it began snowing on Christmas night, 24 hours later than we all wanted it, and we woke up the day after Christmas to snow on the ground.

This is all brought about by a song released in 1942 by Bing Crosby that makes us all want what is described in the song.

Of course here in West Texas, we can add tumbleweeds and mesquite trees to the song like "where the mesquite treetops glisten" or "where the tumbleweeds glisten."

Not sure that is something that Irving Berlin would choose to replace his well-done lyrics, but it would fit better for those of us in West Texas.

According to the Almanac, the only thing we will possibly get this Christmas is rain but it could change to snow in the northern most regions of Texas.

So Amarillo will probably be the only one that sees snow if it happens but the rest of us can enjoy a nice rain shower which is always welcome in the desert of West Texas.

 

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